Saturday, May 14, 2011

Crock Pot Porchetta

When cooking is done right, there really isn't a more blissful experience than eating the fruits of that labor. My friend Kate had a party not too long ago for which she made all kinds of delectable food; one dish in particular had me returning for seconds and even thirds (perhaps a bit gluttonous, I agree). She described it as a slow-cooker version of porchetta.

Having visited the famous little nook that is Porchetta in the East Village just today, I can verify that the slow cooker version is exactly like the one I feasted on a few hours ago, but here, with the bones left in. When you experience for yourself just how juicy and flavorsome this tastes, I think you will agree every bit with my assertions. I welcome you to prove me wrong, in fact. You cannot mess this recipe up if you have a crock pot and sustainably sourced, good quality meat. And with the leftovers you will have, the gifts just keep on giving. ;)



I bought a bone-in (more flavor in the cooking with those bones left in) pork loin roast from Ottomanelli & Sons, one of the oldest family-run butchers here in New York. They have offered pastured and local prime meats for over 80 years. Go there. It is a wonderful experience and they are such sweet fellows (and will take great care of you!). After slathering it with the pureed herb-spice mixture (see recipe below), I simply popped the roast in my crock pot for a number of hours and tried to find distractions from being driven crazy by the intensely savory fragrance filling my home.


I had enough leftovers to last a few days (yippeeeee!). So, I made two types of sandwiches to see if either satisfied me more, and really, they both were outstanding. First, I pan fried thick slices of red onion in a cast iron skillet and sandwiched them with the pork between the heavenly signature semolina-golden raisin-fennel rolls from Amy's Bread. For the other, I toasted a seeded bun and slathered the buttery meat with the last of my homemade grain mustard, and served pickled watermelon rind to accompany the sandwich. Their crunchy texture and sour kick complemented the juicy meat quite nicely. If you find new variations for your delicious leftovers, I want to hear about it! So many options. So much flavor.








7 comments:

  1. Your porchetta looks amazing! I'm always on the lookout for a good dish from the slow cooker. Your photography is splendid as always. I especially like the recipe layered over the photo.

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  2. I´ve been following your work for a while now and i just love it. Delicious recipes, amazing photography, a plate full.

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  3. Thank you both! Really Lynne, you cannot go wrong with this dish. Writing about it makes me want to get another and make it again... Thanks, I am experimenting with layout ideas for a more editorial effect re: recipes and such! A work in progress, for sure....
    Monica, thank you very much! It puts a huge smile on my face to read your kind words.

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  4. Melina,
    What a wonderful blog!! Thank you!
    I am making your crockpot porchetta, along with an assortment of other Italian foods -pasta (of course), antipasti, bruchetta - and wine, wine, wine!! - for a birthday party tomorrow.
    Thanks again!
    Rick S. Pulito

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  5. Hi Rick, glad you found me! You'll have to tell me how the recipe worked out for your birthday party. I hope everyone just loved it. :) If you liked that, I have a couple recipes coming in the next week or so that will have you drooling for sure.... stay tuned!

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  6. i'm so glad you love that recipe :) great idea about the watermelon pickles--

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  7. I really like this porchetta/rillette recipe but the pictures (though creative) behind the actual recipe make it difficult to read, especially if you are using a smart phone. If I am at the store double checking the ingredients nope can't read anything. : ( MAybe a different font would help.

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